MARA-STREAM.ORG

 
THE POLITICS OF OBEDIENCE: THE DISCOURSE OF VOLUNTARY SERVITUDE (or AGAINST THE ONE)

THE POLITICS OF OBEDIENCE: THE DISCOURSE OF VOLUNTARY SERVITUDE (or AGAINST THE ONE)
  

FOR THE PRESENT I should like merely to understand how it happens that so many men, so many villages, so many cities, so many nations, sometimes suffer under a single tyrant who has no other power than the power they give him; who is able to harm them only to the extent to which they have the willingness to bear with him; who could do them absolutely no injury unless they preferred to put up with him rather than contradict him. Surely a striking situation! Yet it is so common that one must grieve the more and wonder the less at the spectacle of a million men serving in wretchedness, their necks under the yoke, not constrained by a greater multitude than they, but simply, it would seem, delighted and charmed by the name of one man alone whose power they need not fear, for he is evidently the one person whose qualities they cannot admire because of his inhumanity and brutality toward them. A weakness characteristic of human kind is that we often have to obey force; we have to make concessions; we ourselves cannot always be the stronger. Therefore, when a nation is constrained by the fortune of war to serve a single clique, as happened when the city of Athens served the thirty Tyrants, one should not be amazed that the nation obeys, but simply be grieved by the situation; or rather, instead of being amazed or saddened, consider patiently the evil and look for- ward hopefully toward a happier future.

But O good Lord! What strange phenomenon is this? What name shall we give it? What is the nature of this misfortune? What vice is it, or, rather, what degradation? To see an end- less multitude of people not merely obeying, but driven to servility? Not ruled, but tyrannized over? These wretches have no wealth, no kin, nor wife nor children, not even life itself that they can call their own. They suffer plundering, wanton- ness, cruelty, not from an army, not from a barbarian horde, on account of whom they must shed their blood and sacrifice their lives, but from a single man; not from a Hercules nor from a Samson, but from a single little man. Too frequently this same little man is the most cowardly and effeminate in the nation, a stranger to the powder of battle and hesitant on the sands of the tournament; not only without energy to direct men by force, but with hardly enough virility to bed with a common woman! Shall we call subjection to such a leader cowardice? Shall we say that those who serve him are cow- ardly and faint-hearted? If two, if three, if four, do not defend themselves from the one, we might call that circumstance sur- prising but nevertheless conceivable. In such a case one might be justified in suspecting a lack of courage. But if a hundred, if a thousand endure the caprice of a single man, should we not rather say that they lack not the courage but the desire to rise against him, and that such an attitude indicates indiffer- ence rather than cowardice?

download here: THE POLITICS OF OBEDIENCE (courtesy of Ludwig Von Mises Institute)


  
This entry was posted on Thursday, January 27th, 2011 at 10:23 am
  
Browse THINK TANK BLOG
  
You can follow any responses tothis entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

————
  

 

  

Comments are closed.